Recent entries in: Breads and Muffins

  • Mini Rhubarb and Jasmine Tea Cream Scones

Mini Rhubarb and Jasmine Tea Cream Scones

Posted on April 13, 2017

This post was originally published here on May 8, 2015. I’ve updated the photos and text to showcase just how delicious these miniature scones really are! Enjoy!

I have a mega soft spot in my heart for fresh rhubarb. I can’t resist those slender stalks and crimson hues. In fact, just take a peak inside my refrigerator at any point between the months of April and June, and you’ll consistently find rhubarb lining the shelves.

I’m hoping to get into some more savory applications for rhubarb this Spring, but in the meantime, I’m happy to be incorporating it into all sorts of baked goods. It’s tart bite makes it ideal for everything from cakes to pies to scones. And rhubarb is even good in cocktails, as I happily discovered last year.

Mini Rhubarb and Jasmine Tea Cream Scones | www.floatingkitchen.net

Also, anyone else totally digging Springtime baking right now? It seems so light and easy. Pretty much the exact opposite of how I feel about Christmas baking, which usually leaves me in a sweaty puddle of anxiety and self loathing (how many Santa cookies did I really just eat?). I can’t fully explain it. All I know is that I want to fit in as much baking as possible before it becomes way too hot to use my oven.

Mini Rhubarb and Jasmine Tea Cream Scones | www.floatingkitchen.net

These Mini Rhubarb and Jasmine Tea Cream Scones have brunch written all over them. They would be perfect for Easter or Mother’s Day. I love that they are miniature, because that means either (a) eating one won’t fill you up so you can comfortably enjoy the rest of your meal, or (b) you can eat three of them! Both scenarios have happened to me. And both are likely to occur again in the future. This is real life.

Mini Rhubarb and Jasmine Tea Cream Scones | www.floatingkitchen.net

The tea is a fun addition that makes these scones feel extra “Springy” to me. I stir some into the dough. Then sprinkle the rest on top before baking. I used jasmine tea for this recipe, but chamomile or other varieties would work equally well. Loose leaf tea is probably your best option. But if you can’t find it, you can purchase tea bags and simply tear them open to access the tea leaves inside.

Make sure to keep the rhubarb pieces small-ish for this recipe. Because these scones are miniature, they cook up relatively fast. And you don’t want to be left with any overly firm pieces of rhubarb. I try to keep the pieces about a 1/2-inch in size (like the size of an almond).

Cheers,

Liz

Recipe adapted from Joy the Baker

Mini Rhubarb and Jasmine Tea Cream Scones

Yield: Makes about 18 scones

Mini Rhubarb and Jasmine Tea Cream Scones

Ingredients

  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1/2 tsp. jasmine tea leaves, divided
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • About 1 1/2 cups heavy cream, plus more for brushing the tops
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 1 cup chopped rhubarb (keep the pieces about 1/2-inch in size)
  • 1/4 cup turbinado sugar

Instructions

  1. Pre-heat your oven to 425 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and set it aside.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, granulated sugar, baking powder, salt and 1 tablespoon of the jasmine tea leaves.
  3. Measure out 1 1/3 cups of heavy cream. Mix in the vanilla extract. Slowly add the cream mixture to the dry ingredients, stirring with a wooden spoon as you pour in the cream. Gently stir in the rhubarb. Add more cream if necessary, one tablespoon at a time, so the dough is moist and holds together loosely (it will be a bit shaggy).
  4. Dump the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and use your hands to form it into a disk about 3/4-inches thick. Using a small round biscuit or cookie cutter (I used a 2-inch cookie cutter), cut out small circles from the dough disk. Transfer the circles to your baking sheet, placing them about 1-inch apart. Gently re-shape the scraps and continue cutting out circles until all the dough has been used.
  5. Brush the top of each circle with heavy cream. In a small bowl, mix together the turbinado sugar with the remaining 1/2 tsp. of jasmine tea leaves. Sprinkle the sugar mixture over top of the circles.
  6. Transfer to your pre-heated oven and bake for 15-18 minutes, or until golden brown on top. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool slightly.
  7. Scones are best when served while still slightly warm. Once fully cooled, they can be stored in an airtight container for 1-2 days at room temperature.
https://www.floatingkitchen.net/mini-rhubarb-and-jasmine-tea-cream-scones/
  • Blood Orange Scones with Hazelnuts, Thyme and White Chocolate Drizzle

Blood Orange Scones with Hazelnuts, Thyme and White Chocolate Drizzle

Posted on February 20, 2017

This post was originally published here on January 14, 2015. I’ve since updated the photos and text to showcase just how delicious these scones really are! Enjoy!

I’ve discovered a socially acceptable way to enjoy cake for breakfast. It’s called “Blood Orange Scones with Hazelnuts, Thyme and White Chocolate Drizzle”.

Are you with me? I’m guessing you are. Because we’re all friends here. And friends encourage friends to eat cake disguised as sophisticated scones before noontime. Right?

Blood Orange Scones with Hazelnuts, Thyme and White Chocolate Drizzle | www.floatingkitchen.net

I’m still on a big Winter citrus kick right now. And I’m particularly crushing on blood oranges. I mean, their color alone is enough to make any girl swoon. If they weren’t so delicious, I could probably just stare at them all day long.

So I decided to try and incorporate them into this cream scone recipe that I’ve been using for a while now. I was a little worried that I would just end up with a gummy, shaggy mess because of all the juices from the blood oranges. But (thankfully!) that didn’t happen. Instead, I found myself in possession of the most moist (had to say it!), cake-like scones I’ve ever eaten. There isn’t anything dry and crumbly about these babies!

Can we talk about segmenting oranges for a second? I hate it. Probably because I’m not very good at it. And I don’t like doing things that I’m not very good at. Sorry. I’m a brat.

If you’re a master at segmenting oranges, then I applaud you (also teach me your ways!). But you really don’t have to be for this recipe. Because you actually want to break down the segments even further so they are about 1/2-inch in size or smaller before attempting to fold them into the dough. This helps the orange pieces spread out more evenly throughout the dough, while preventing too many juices from accumulating in one place.

Blood Orange Scones with Hazelnuts, Thyme and White Chocolate Drizzle | www.floatingkitchen.net

Blood oranges can typically be found until March (although sometimes longer if you’re lucky!). So don’t delay too long on picking some up from your grocery store. Because I know you’re not going to want to wait until next year to try baking up these scones!

Cheers,

Liz

Blood Orange Scones with Hazelnuts, Thyme and White Chocolate Drizzle

Yield: Makes 8 scones

Blood Orange Scones with Hazelnuts, Thyme and White Chocolate Drizzle

Ingredients

  • For the Scones
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup hazelnut flour
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp. baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 cup (8 tablespoons) cold butter, cut into pieces
  • 2/3 cusp, plus 1 tablespoon, heavy whipping cream, divided
  • 1/4 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves
  • 1 tablespoon blood orange zest
  • 1/2 cup blood orange segments, broken down into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1/3 cup hazelnuts, chopped

  • For the White Chocolate Drizzle
  • 4 ounces white chocolate, chopped
  • 1 tsp. coconut oil

Instructions

  1. Pre-heat your oven to 425 degrees. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper and set it aside.
  2. In the bowl of your food processor with the blade attachment, combine the flours, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Add the cold butter and pulse until you have a coarse crumb.
  3. In a small bowl, beat together 2/3 cups of the heavy cream with the vanilla extract and egg. Add this liquid mixture to your food processor along with the thyme and blood orange zest. Pulse until the dough has just come together.
  4. Turn the dough out onto a well floured counter top and use your hands (flouring them will make the dough easier to handle) to fold in the blood orange segments and the hazelnuts, being careful not to over work the dough. The dough will be slightly wet.
  5. Continue using your hands to shape the dough into a round disk. Then cut the disk it into eight wedges. Transfer the wedges to your prepared baking sheet, leaving 1-2 inches between them. Brush the tops of the wedges with the remaining tablespoon of heavy cream. Transfer the baking sheet to your pre-heated oven and bake the scones for 13-15 minutes. They should be golden brown around the edges. Remove the scones from the oven and allow them to cool on their baking sheet for 10-15 minutes before transferring them to a wire rack to continue cooling.
  6. Once the scones have cooled, make the white chocolate drizzle. In a small heavy bottom saucepan (or in a double boiler) set over medium heat, melt the white chocolate with the coconut oil, stirring frequently. Once smooth, drizzle the melted white chocolate over the scones.
  7. These scones are best when eaten the day they are made, but they will keep for 1-2 days in an airtight container at room temperature. Allow the white chocolate to set before transferring them to a storage container.

Notes

1. You can make your own hazelnut flour by grinding hazelnuts to a course meal in your food processor. You could also substitute almond flour for the hazelnut flour.

https://www.floatingkitchen.net/blood-orange-scones-with-hazelnuts-thyme-and-white-chocolate-drizzle/

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