Meyer Lemon Pudding Cake

Meyer Lemon Pudding Cake |
  • Meyer Lemon Pudding Cake
Posted on February 22, 2014

This may be the best dessert I’ve made so far this year.

Bold statement. I know. Although not that bold, because it’s only February and we’ve got a ways to go before we finish out the year.

But until then, this Meyer Lemon Pudding Cake takes top billing.

I was a bit surprised by how much I loved this dessert. Because generally, if a dessert isn’t chocolatey, I feel sort of underwhelmed by it. I’m a chocoholic to the core. But this Meyer Lemon Pudding Cake doesn’t have a drop of chocolate in it. And yet, here I am, professing my undying devotion to it.

Meyer Lemon Pudding Cake |

What’s special about this dessert is that it’s like having two desserts in one (which is never a bad thing, in my humble opinion). During the baking process something magical happens and two distinct layers are formed: a top layer that is light, airy and sweet (the cake part), and a bottom layer that is silky, smooth and tangy (the pudding part). The end result is a dessert in which every single bite provides you with the perfect mixture of textures and flavors.

I love the use of Meyer lemons here. Their flavor is really unique and beautiful and less “in-your-face” than regular lemons. I highly recommend seeking them out. But if you can’t find Meyer lemons, you can certainly use regular lemons in this recipe, but the results may be a little more pucker-inducing.



Recipe from Bijouxs

Meyer Lemon Pudding Cake

Serves 6-8

Meyer Lemon Pudding Cake


  • For the Pudding Cake
  • 4 eggs, whites and yolks separated
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 5 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and cooled
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup fresh squeezed Meyer lemon juice (from about 3-4 lemons)
  • 1/4 cup whole milk
  • Finely grated zest from 2 Meyer lemons
  • For Serving
  • Powdered sugar
  • Fresh blueberries


  1. Pre-heat your oven to 350 degrees. Grease a baking dish with a 6-cup capacity and set it aside (see my notes below about baking dishes).
  2. In the bowl of your mixer with the whisk attachment, beat the egg whites on medium-low speed until they turn foamy. Then increase the speed to medium-high and beat until glossy peaks form, about 1-2 minutes. Gently transfer the egg whites from the bowl of your mixer into a second bowl and set aside.
  3. In the bowl of your mixer (no need to clean it out from above), combine the sugar, butter and flour. Add the egg yolks, lemon juice, milk and lemon zest. Mix until well combined, scraping down the sides of the bowl as necessary. With a rubber spatula gently fold in the beaten egg whites, folding in about one-third at a time, until they are just incorporated.
  4. Pour the batter into your greased baking dish. Transfer to your pre-heated oven and bake until the cake is set and the top is golden brown. Depending on the size and depth of your dish, this could take anywhere from 30-40 minutes (see my notes below for suggestions on baking times). You can also take the temperature of the pudding layer to determine doneness, which should be 172-175 degrees Fahrenheit.
  5. Remove from the oven and allow the pudding cake to cool slightly. Dust with powdered sugar and top with fresh blueberries before serving. This cake can be enjoyed slightly warm, room temperature (my personal preference) or cold.


1. I've made this recipe in a 9 X 9-inch square baking dish, which results in a relatively thin cake, and takes approximately 30 minutes to bake. The photo you see above uses an 8-inch round casserole dish, resulting in a thicker cake that takes approximately 40 minutes to bake.

2. If you use regular lemons, I recommend using the zest from just a single lemon.


  • This looks so good I love the idea of a pudding cake, Ive never had a meyer lemon but would love to try one.


    • You should definitely try and find Meyer Lemons if you can. They are really special. But if you can’t, definitely make this with regular lemons! Thanks for stopping by, Rebecca!

  • Have you ever tried it in individual ramekins? How do you think that would work?


    • Hi Janet. I have not, but I’m guessing it would work. You’ll have to carefully monitor them for done-ness. They will certainly take less time to cook.

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  • Delicious! My family loved this. It really does come out in two distinct layers (my favorite being the top, airy spongy layer) The only problem was I should have made two! I made it in an 8×8 dish and there wasn’t enough for seconds!! 🙂


    • So glad you loved it! It’s one of my favorites, too!

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